Products

Central Vacuum FAQs

Why should I install a central vacuum?
Installing a central vacuum system in your home not only will save you time and money, but it's also good for the environment. In addition, a central vacuum reduces allergies and is quiet, versatile, and cost effective: most homeowners recoup their investment once the home is sold.

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What's the difference between a portable vacuum and a central vacuum?
These are completely different vacuuming experiences. First, because the central vacuum is a built-in appliance, you've eliminated the most annoying features of a portable vacuum cleaner: noise and smell. Second, dust and pollutants get transported out of the living area with a central vacuum system and are not re-circulated back into the living area through the exhaust as with a portable vacuum. Finally, instead of wrestling with a heavy machine or a cumbersome hose as is the case with a portable system, you are vacuuming with a single hose, enabling you to clean your home freely and easily wherever you like.

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Can a central vacuum be installed in a home that is already built?
Yes, a central vacuum system can be installed in almost any existing home without any damage or costly modifications.

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Can I install a central vacuum system myself?
Yes, we can sell you all of the necessary tubing and fittings to do it yourself or you can arrange for our trained installers to do it for you.

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How does a central vacuum system work?
A system of 2" PVC tubing is installed in the walls of your home which lead to a power unit that is typically located in the garage or utility room. The power unit is activated when a vacuum hose is plugged into one of the valves located in your home.

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Does the power unit have to be vented outside?
Not all systems need to be vented to the outside. Our technicians can help you determine if your power unit needs to be vented.

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How is dirt collected?
Everything swept into the vacuum travels through the hose and PVC pipes and then gets deposited into a dirt container at the main vacuum unit. Eventually the container will need to be emptied or changed; however, most central vacuums literally gallons of debris, so they need to be emptied or changed only a couple times per year.

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How many inlet valves are required in the average home?
A good rule of thumb is 600 sq ft per inlet valve using a 30' hose

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Why not put an inlet valve in every room?
You will increase both material and labor costs. Also, you would lose the convenience by having to unplug and reconnect your hose more than necessary.

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Does the vacuum's power diminish the farther away from the source the hose is used?
The motors in the power unit, in the garage or utility room, are larger and more powerful than portable and canister vacuums. For this reason, the suction power remains strong no matter where you are vacuuming inside the house. Also, most central vacuum manufacturers have several models to choose from, for a home of any size, so you can be assured of top performance at all times. We can help you determine which brand and model is right for you.

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Is the 30' hose heavy?
No, all hoses, both electrified and low voltage, are made of high quality lightweight materials to provide you with long life, durability and lightweight convenience.

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What is the difference between electrified and low voltage hoses?
Both hoses have 24v, low voltage wiring which sends a signal to the power unit to turn on. Electrified hoses also have 110v/120v wiring molded into them for use with electric carpet brushes.

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Do I need an electrician to connect my central vacuum system?
Not usually. Most central vacuum power units can be plugged into your normal house electrical outlet, but we recommend a dedicated circuit. We can help you determine if a special plug is needed.

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Why does static electricity build up in my wands?
The shock that you may sometimes feel is static electricity building up in your metal wands. This has nothing to do with electrical wiring and does not mean that something is wrong with your system. When vacuuming, electrons from the dust particles build up in the wands as static electricity and when it jumps from the wand it can create a shock. To avoid this, simply hold a portion of your hand or finger on the metal wand, this will allow the charge to dissipate. Another option is to wipe the hose, handle and wand with a dryer sheet.

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